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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Motivational and metacognitive aspects of strategy use and transfer found in the catalog.

Motivational and metacognitive aspects of strategy use and transfer

Keri Weed

Motivational and metacognitive aspects of strategy use and transfer

by Keri Weed

  • 127 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Educational Resources Information Center in Washington, D.C .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementKeri Weed...[et al.].
SeriesERIC reports
ContributionsAmerican Educational Research Association., Educational Resources Information Center.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19848143M

Motivation and Transfer: The Role of Achievement Goals in Preparation for Future strategy use, response to difficulties or simple measures of learning, but rarely of the transfer of knowledge (i.e., Elliott & Dweck, ). not capture other aspects of transfer, such as preparation for future learning, or what one “transfers in” to a. strategies, and knowledge about when and why to use strategies. Metacognitive regulation is the monitoring of one’s cognition and includes planning activities, awareness of comprehension and task performance, and evaluation of the efficacy of monitoring processes and strategies. Recent.

Metacognition is one’s ability to use prior knowledge to plan a strategy for approaching a learning task, take necessary steps to problem solve, reflect on and evaluate results, and modify one’s approach as needed. It helps learners choose the right cognitive tool for the task and plays a . Introduction. Metacognition is a thinking skill, also called ‘thinking about thinking’. Researchers have identified metacognition as essential to science education in general and to the development of scientific literacy in particular, as it is key for developing profound conceptual understanding of scientific ideas, scientific practices, and self‐regulated learning. In short.

  Metacognitive strategies refers to methods used to help students understand the way they learn; in other words, it means processes designed for students to ‘think’ about their ‘thinking’. Teachers who use metacognitive strategies can positively impact students who have learning disabilities by helping them to develop an appropriate plan. In her article, "Direct Instruction of Metacognition Benefits Adolescent Science Learning, Transfer, and Motivation: An In Vivo Study" (PDF, KB), Ms. Zepeda and her colleagues examined how instructing students on metacognitive strategies influenced their ability to apply conceptual information and motivation after instruction.


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Motivational and metacognitive aspects of strategy use and transfer by Keri Weed Download PDF EPUB FB2

This article examines the role of cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational skills in problem solving. Cognitive skills include instructional objectives, components in a learning hierarchy, and components in information processing. Metacognitive skills include strategies for reading comprehension, writing, and mathematics.

Motivational skills include motivation based on interest, Cited by: The influences of locus of control, awareness of control and metacognition on the use and transfer of a trained strategy were examined. Specifically, it was hypothesized that internal locus of control would be associated with more strategic performance, and that those children who were able to both accurately assess their performance with and without using the trained strategies and who Cited by: 1.

Accordingly, a near-transfer task can be solved with the same metacognitive and cognitive strategies, even when the content of the text differs between the training and learning task (see Fig. This chapter examines the role of cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational skills in problem solving.

Cognitive skills include instructional objectives, components in a learning hierarchy, and components in information processing. Metacognitive skills include strategies Cited by:   Metacognitive strategy use as the other variable of the study is defined as thinking about thinking or thinking about your own studies.

The strategy use is also an important factor for language learning. Therefore, the purpose of the study is to investigate the relationship among listening proficiency, motivation and metacognitive strategy by: 3. On the other hand, some adults do not spontaneously transfer metacognitive skills to new settings and thus, will need help doing so.

Examples of Metacognition Skills You May Use. Successful learners typically use metacognitive strategies whenever they learn. But they may fail to use the best strategy for each type of learning situation. DEVF.I-OPMENTAL REVIEW. 6, () Children's Reading Strategies, Metacognition, and Motivation SCOTT G.

PARIS AND EVELYN R. OKA University of Michigan Training studies in the field of children's reading have been useful methods for both theoretical understanding of the development of skilled reading and the improvement of educational practices.

solving transfer. In addition to possessing domain-specific skills, problem solvers need to be able to manage their skills; in short, metaskill seems to be an important component in problem solving.

Metaskills (or metacognitive knowledge) involves knowledge of when to use, how to coordinate, and how to monitor various skills in problem solving. In short, metacognitive awareness of strategy effects produced by monitoring and use of metacognitive awareness in regulating strategy choice were more pronounced in the younger compared with the.

with a motivational orientation involving goals of mastery, learning, and challenge, as well as beliefs that the task is interesting and important, will engage in more metacognitive activity, more cognitive strategy use, and more effective effort management (e.g., Ames & Archer, ; Dweck & Elliott.

solving transfer. In addition to possessing domain-specific skills, problem solvers need to be able to manage their skills; in short, metaskill seems to be an important component in problem solving.

Metaskills (or metacognitive knowledge) involves knowledge of when to use, how to coordinate, and how to monitor various skills in problem solving. The following is from the section, "Metacognition—Reflecting on Learning Goals, Strategies, and Results." Metacognition, simply put, is the process of thinking about thinking.

It is important in every aspect of school and life, since it involves self-reflection on one’s current position, future goals, potential actions and strategies, and. According to researcher John Hattie, the effect size for teaching metacognitive strategies ismaking it one of the most effective teaching interventions.

Metacognition is also a significant factor in whether students can transfer their learning to new scenarios. Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.

More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner.

Metacognition, or thinking about one’s thinking, is key to facilitating lasting learning experiences and developing lifelong learners. Linda Darling-Hammond and her colleagues () identify two types of metacognition: reflection, or “thinking about what we know,” and self-regulation, or “managing how we go about learning.".

Conditions] factors affecting Principle of transfer transfer of learning Variety of learning experiences Context for learner's experiences Focus on principles rather than task Emphasis on metacognition Exposure to many examples and opportunities for practice to encourage transfer Transfer of learning is most likely to happen when learners.

Part 2 — Metacognitive Learning Strategies to Increase Transfer. Part 2 explains how Strategies for Learning increase Transfers of addition to the direct benefits of these cognitive-and-metacognitive Strategies for Learning to improve "the quality of learning, thinking, and performance," including transfer, "when students use a design process to develop Learning Strategies they.

5. Model the use of metacognition by talking through problems so that students can learn how to use higher-order thinking strategies by listening as you problem solve aloud. The strategies shared in this blog post are adapted from the book Teaching Students to Drive Their Brains: Metacognitive Strategies, Activities, and Lesson Ideas (ASCD, ).

This awareness is developmental and lies on a continuum. Proficient readers use one or more metacognitive strategies to comprehend text.

The use of such strategies has developed over time as the reader learns which ones are best suited to aid in comprehension (Pressley, Wharton-McDonald, Mistretta-Hampston, & Echevarria, ). Motivation involves a constellation of beliefs, perceptions, values, interests, and actions that are all closely related.

As a result, various approaches to motivation can focus on cognitive behaviors (such as monitoring and strategy use), non-cognitive aspects (such as.

Metacognitive Reading Strategies, Motivation, and Reading Comprehension Performance of Saudi EFL Students objectives (Iwai, ). It has three main aspects: metacognitive knowledge, metacognitive monitoring, and self-regulation and control (Pintrich, Wolters & Baxter, ) and is viewed in two dimensions: 1) the use of metacognitive.The basic metacognitive strategies are: Connecting new information to former knowledge.

Selecting thinking strategies deliberately. Planning, monitoring, and evaluating thinking processes. (Dirkes, ) Knowledge types. Paris, Cross, and Lipson () describe three aspects of this self-control of strategies for learning.Motivational strategies 10 3.

Prior meta-analyses 11 which motivational and cognitive aspects are intertwined (Boekaerts, ). In short, self-regulated learning is a complex process, containing cognitive, when to use learning strategies. Metacognitive knowledge can either refer to oneself (the.